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There is a question about the usage of "for noun to verb". Have I put it correctly in my sentence? And also does my sentence sound natural and make sense for the English speaker, because I am afraid it is too complicated.

When making a call, for volume level to be satisfactory for the other party, you can adjust it in the input sound settings of your laptop.

The sentence is from a technical manual, that is why it has to sound formal, and I made it that long. I want to say that you are supposed to control the volume of your microphone in your laptop.

Is it right? Perhaps the phrase to make satisfactory volume level for the other party would sound better?

I would be pleased If you could assist me with this question.

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for in this usage introduces a condition that must be met. I do not think that is your meaning.

For a package to be shipped by air, it must not contain certain items, including flammable gases and batteries.

You wrote: When making a call, for volume level to be satisfactory for the other party, you can adjust it in the input sound settings of your laptop.

What you mean to say is something like this:

If the other party finds the volume level unsatisfactory, it can be adjusted in the Input Sound settings of your laptop.

or

If the other party finds the volume too loud or too quiet, make the necessary adjustment in the Input Sound settings of your laptop.

or

If the volume is too loud or too quiet for the other party, you can adjust it [or "it can be adjusted" if you want to avoid "you"] in the Input Sound settings of your laptop.

  • Your answers are always so detailed, thank you! Doesn't it sound clumsy if I put the when making a call part in front of the sentence? Because without it, there can be miscommunication. When making a call, if the other party finds the volume level unsatisfactory, make the necessary adjustment in the Input Sound settings of your laptop. – Gamilato Sep 20 '18 at 12:37
  • It might sound a little clumsy to have when making .... make the necessary. But my main reason for omitting "when making a call" is that it is unnecessary when you have mentioned "the other party". – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 20 '18 at 12:42
  • Really? But will it be obvious for the reader that it is about the making a call only by "the other party"? Actually there would be not only English speaking readers of it, but also those who are not English native speakers. That is my concern. – Gamilato Sep 20 '18 at 12:50
  • There's no harm in beginning the sentence "When making a call", and I wouldn't worry then about any slight stylistic clumsiness. Writing English so that it is intelligible to those who don't know it well is a challenge. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 20 '18 at 12:58
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While this sentence is understandable, it could be better if you added in a 'the' after 'for'.

Eg. "When making a call, for the volume level to be satisfactory for the other party, you can adjust it in the input sound settings of your laptop."

While grammatically correct, this doesn't sound completely natural. A more natural way to convey the same meaning could be to say "When making a call, to make the volume level satisfactory for the other party, you can adjust it in the input sound settings of your laptop" - Note the removal of to be.

While this is a slightly different grammar structure to the one you were thinking about, it certainly sounds more natural in this context. Some sentences where for noun to verb sound more natural:

It is essential for my son to play sport every weekend

My cousin wished for the All Blacks to win tonight's match

One thing you will notice is the common usage of another word in between for and the noun. In this case, my and again, the. While understandable without these words, they are necessary for the sentences to be grammatically correct.

As for your second sentence, to make satisfactory volume level for the other party, this certainly doesn't sound as natural as the first sentence proposed, and would need large restructure to seem correct. Your initial thought was much better.

So overall, the first sentence is very close to having correct grammar, but possibly isn't the most appropriate use of the grammar structure if you want to sound natural.

Hope this helps :)

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