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I know adj can come between more and than but I don’t know why the clause can replace in adj position.

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    Your phrase would be easier to understand as “I will know more than I know now after I study”, keeping the "knowledge" related phrases next to each other. – user3169 Sep 21 '18 at 20:34
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The basic statement is

I will know more ... than I know now.

after I study is adjunct info and yes, it can come between more and than.

The phrase can also begin the sentence or end it:

After I study I will know more than I know now.

I will know more than I know now after I study.

You can also do that when more modifies a noun:

They watched more TV in one week than he watched in a year.

In one week they watched more TV than he watched in a year.

This is awkward and a little confusing but not ungrammatical:

They watched more TV than he watched in a year, in one week.

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  • I understand it more but I have got confused between a phrase and a clause. I think that it will be a clause because it accompanies by Subject and a verb (I think it is Adverb clause). Is there something wrong about my understanding? thankyou. – Martuaii Sep 22 '18 at 6:38
  • You're right, there is a verb there, and a subject, and it is a clause. It is temporal. The idea could also be expressed using the present perfect: after I have studied. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 22 '18 at 11:11

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