1

This is an excerption from an invitation email template:

We meet on Wednesday evenings during term time. We would be honored if you would accept this invitation to join us on a Wednesday evening. Our diary for the coming year is still quite flexible, but the most ideal dates for us would be ...

I looked up the dictionary and there are two meanings for the word "diary".

  1. (North American English datebook) a book with spaces for each day of the year in which you can write down things you have to do in the future
  2. a book in which you can write down the experiences you have each day, your private thoughts, etc.

I reckon the bold "diary" fits definition 1 best. But I wonder if it a typical use of diary this word. If it were me, I would choice "schedule" or "plan".

Our schedule for the coming year is still quite flexible...
Our plan for the coming year is still quite flexible
3

This use of "diary" seems to be more or less exclusively BrE. You just needed to have checked the British dictionaries:

diary (n): (British) A book with spaces for each day of the year in which one notes appointments or information.

In AmE, we would be more likely to use appointment book, engagement book, calendar, schedule, or in some cases daybook or agenda.

2
  • But I also want to ask if the sentence "Our diary for the coming year is still quite flexible" sounds natural. Would you prefer to put it as "Our schedule for the coming year is still quite flexible"? or other words instead of "diary"
    – chika
    Sep 30 '18 at 5:06
  • 1
    @chika As I said, this use of "diary" is quite British. Being American, it sounds odd to me, but if a British person said it, I would assume it's perfectly natural. It's just dialect, as there are many American words for things that the British generally don't use, like truck, apartment, and elevator (respectively lorry, flat, and lift in the UK).
    – Andrew
    Sep 30 '18 at 15:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.