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Does this phrase make sense to describe the passing away of life every moment?

I wasted some moments of my ever last passing.

If not, what would be the correct phrase to mean passing away of life every moment?

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“I wasted some moments of my ever last passing”

Here, 'my ever last passing' makes little sense. The phrase you may be looking for is 'passing me by', which means that something has happened without you taking notice.

Thus, the alternatives are:

"I wasted (some) moments of everyday life as it passed me by."

  • Although the meaning shifts a little bit, I think that could also be shortened to: I wasted my life as it passed me by. – J.R. Oct 4 '18 at 10:52
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You might want to check out the verb fritter.

The website Vocabulary.com says:

A person who fritters chooses to spend their energy on things that are wasteful. You can fritter money, time, or energy, but once you've "frittered it away," you can't get it back!

Some definitions include:

to waste (money, time, etc.) bit by bit on petty things (Collins)

to reduce or squander little by little (AH)

to occupy oneself idly or without clear purpose; to tinker with an unimportant part of a project; to dally, sometimes as a form of procrastination (Wiktionary)

M-W also mentions that it word is often used with away.

So, one could say:

Life is short – and I frittered mine away.

  • I also like: I frittered away my life as it passed me by, but "passed me by" was already suggested in an earlier answer. – J.R. Oct 4 '18 at 10:59
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I wasted some moments of my ever last passing.

"my ever last passing." is not a phrase used in english.

You might feel your life ebbing away...

ebb - (noun): like the movement of the tide out to sea. - (verb): (of an emotion or quality) to gradually decrease.

I wasted some moments as I felt my life [slowly] ebb away. (At the moment of death)

or

I wasted some moments as I felt my life [slowly] ebb away, day by day.

(To describe a much longer period of time, possibly a number of years - a regret.)

Alternatively, like Hamlet: "To shuffle off this mortal coil."

Mortal coil is a poetic term for the troubles of daily life and the strife and suffering of the world. It is used in the sense of a burden to be carried or abandoned. To "shuffle off this mortal coil" is to die, as exemplified in the "To be, or not to be" soliloquy in Shakespeare's Hamlet.

I wasted some moments as I [gradually] shuffled off my mortal coil.

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