0

The sentence is:

Intrigued by its success, I wanted to deepen my knowledge of the language’s history and of the unique culture that sprang around it.

I wrote it as a part of a project I have to submit, and there are two distinct aspects of this sentence that make me doubt its grammatical correctness:

  • Is the use of the word "of" (in bold, in both instances) appropriate here? I'm conflicted between using it and "about".
  • According to Google, the definition of the verb "to spring" is "to originate or arise from", and in my sentence, the unique culture sprang around the language and not from it. Is the usage here correct? Should I replace it with "grew" or something like that?

Help will be much appreciated :)

0

In your example

Intrigued by its success, I wanted to deepen my knowledge of the language’s history and of the unique culture that sprang around it.

The use of "of" certainly does have the meaning "about"

Intrigued by its success, I wanted to deepen my knowledge about the language’s history and about the unique culture that sprang around it.

Though it may be better to use

Intrigued by its success, I wanted to deepen my knowledge about the language’s history and of the unique culture that sprang around it.

to avoid repetition of "about".

For your second part, usually the phrase is

sprung up

Intrigued by its success, I wanted to deepen my knowledge about the language’s history and of the unique culture that sprung up around it.

  • Thanks! Now when I think of it, can I use "sprouted" instead of "sprung up"? – Blabla Sep 30 '18 at 16:13
  • Yes, that would be as understandable, but the nuance is "sprouted" is less forceful than "sprung up". – Peter Sep 30 '18 at 16:16

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.