1

Please see the following sentence:

It is not much difficult to bend a free kick round a wall of defenders.

I am not sure which of the following meanings of the word "round" fits here:

adv. 1. In a circular progression or movement; around. 2. With revolutions: wheels moving round. 3. To a specific place or person: called round for the pastor; sent round for the veterinarian.

prep. 1. Around. 2. From the beginning to the end of; throughout: a plant that grows round the year.

  • In my opinion, it's "perp. 1. Around". – holydragon Oct 3 '18 at 2:01
  • Can you say whether the usage in your example is as an adverb or a preposition? Also is there a source for your example, or you wrote it? – user3169 Oct 3 '18 at 2:06
0

In your example, the use of

round

instead of

around

is more a British usage.

You have your shirt the wrong way round (BrE)
You have your shirt the wrong way around (AmE)

So, the meaning of your example sentence is

It is not much difficult to bend a free kick around a wall of defenders.

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