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I'm taught that in indirect questions the verb comes after the subject:

Do you know what time the bank opens?

But what if the question proper goes first? Should one say

What time the bank opens is an interesting question

or

What time does the bank open is an interesting question?

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    It matters not whether the embedded question is preposed or follows the matrix verb. In both constructions there should be no inversion.
    – BillJ
    Oct 6 '18 at 18:02
  • You have green-ticked a wrong answer. These are embedded questions and hence there should be no inversion.
    – BillJ
    Oct 6 '18 at 18:45
  • But that's exactly what the author says: " What time the bank opens is an interesting question. is correct"
    – Serguei
    Oct 6 '18 at 18:50
  • Yes, it is correct, but the point is that "what time the bank opens" is an embedded question and that is why there should be no inversion.
    – BillJ
    Oct 6 '18 at 18:53
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Your first version

What time the bank opens is an interesting question.

is correct because 'What time the bank opens' is a nominal clause which functions as the subject of the verb is.

https://www.englishgrammar.org/relative-pronoun/

To turn the question 'What time does the bank open?' into subject, it is possible to use quotation marks:

"What time does the bank open?" is an interesting question.

It is rarely used phraseology, but here's another example where quoted questions function as noun phrases:

The Dream Questionnaire items included “How often do you remember your dreams?” and “What do you most often dream about?” http://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2011/08/punctuating-around-quotation-marks.html

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  • "What time the bank open" is not a nominal clause. It's a subordinate interrogative clause (embedded question), and since it is subordinate, no inversion is required. You've omitted the two most important factors!
    – BillJ
    Oct 6 '18 at 18:52
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[1] Do you know [what time the bank opens]?

[2] [What time the bank opens] is an interesting question.

In both examples, the bracketed constituent is a subordinate interrogative clause (embedded question).

It matters not whether the embedded question is complement of a verb, as in [1], or subject of the sentence. In both constructions there should be no inversion.

The meaning of [1] is:

"Do you know the answer to the question 'What time does the bank open?'"

And the meaning of [2] is:

"The answer to the question 'What time does the bank open?' is an interesting question".

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