2
  1. Michael is Production Technology Manager for the facility
  2. Michael is Production Technology Manager of the facility
  3. Michael is Production Technology Manager with the facility

I have seen president of GE, a senior journelist with CNN, but I don't see "title" for a company. I assume the write is good than me in English. Is there a general rule for this?

2

I'll do these out of order.

  1. Michael is Production Technology Manager of the facility

This is the most standard way for a job title to be. He is the facility power technology manager. Normally you would probably use "the" before the word "Production" here.

  1. Michael is Production Technology Manager for the facility

This version is reasonably common but takes a little different perspective. He works for the facility, rather than for the company that owns it. Normally there is no difference between these two, but this kind of feels more like you are describing what he does than giving a standard title. Interchangeable with the above version in pretty much all cases.

  1. Michael is Production Technology Manager with the facility

This is an unusual way to put things. Usually if you are "with" something, it is some organization other than the company you work for. You might possibly use this phrasing if you were a news reporter and he is speaking for the company. It emphasizes that he is allied with the organization, rather than simply giving his title.

You might also use "with" a company if you are speaking of someone who is changing jobs, but this is not a job title

He was with Goldman Sachs but now he's with a local bank.

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  • +1 particularly for Usually if you are "with" something, it is some organization other than the company you work for. I thought about exactly that difference myself, but before scrolling down to see your answer I'd almost decided to post a comment along the same lines. And I was going to say ...some named organisation [such as Microsoft] - but as your final example clearly shows, that wouldn't have been the whole story. I know you could have said ...now he's with the local bank, which would still "sorta" fit my definition, but a blows that idea clean outta the water! :) – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Oct 8 '18 at 17:18
  • 1
    I would just add that, for journalists, with is idiomatic and possibly hearkens to freelance journalists who make money by selling stories to major news outlets (e.g. Gregory Peck's character in the movie Roman Holiday). I don't know how common this is anymore. – Andrew Oct 8 '18 at 18:23
  • Also common is I am an X at Y. (I realize that preposition wasn't listed in the question.) – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Oct 8 '18 at 19:25

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