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I know that these words mentioned above aren't related, however, I wonder why not. As a non-native English speaker it is kind of confusing because both are somehow referring to an antecedent context, at least that is what it seems to me when I read "having said this". Synonyms of "having said this" are words like 'although', 'nevertheless", 'despite all that' et cetera, but again, I cannot see the difference if I read the latter one by one.

Can someone enlighten me?

  • It doesn't usually make any difference whether you use this or that in such contexts. Nor does it usually make any difference whether you say With that said or Having said this. But That being so would often have significantly different implications - it usually implies because that is true, where the alternatives imply despite that being said. – FumbleFingers Oct 9 '18 at 16:56
  • @Val I'm confused. As a native English speaker (American) all three versions of what you've written seem like similar use phrases to me. I don't understand what you mean by "...these words mentioned above aren't related..." They ARE related. They all carry the same connotation and meaning. Maybe I'm missing something? – user9570789 Oct 9 '18 at 21:06
  • You probably put to much stress on this or that, however the issue is somewhere else: All three phrases seem to me (!) to translate the same, albeit 'With that said' / 'That being said' does not negate a preceding statement, whereas 'Having said that' does. Word-by-word translation of the latter phrase seems (for me) to mean the same as "This being so", while they obviously have two completely different meanings. This is why I rose this question. – Val Oct 10 '18 at 6:48
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In some contexts, there is little difference between the phrases in your question title.

However, they do have different uses and meanings—and other contexts make that clearer.

That being so.

Here, you are effectively saying, "given that" or "because that is true."

You will follow this up with something else that can now occur because of the previously stated fact:

Gravity causes unsupported items to fall downward. That being so, when I drop this pen it falls to the floor.

Using a magnifying glass to focus sunlight can intensify its normal effects. That being so, it can be used to burn things.


With that said.

I normally encounter this phrase as something that follows an obligatory statement and precedes what you really want to say. Or, it can be used as a "disclaimer" for what is to come.

First, I need to thank the Academy. With that said, I'd like to talk a bit about my life and how I got to this point.

English is not my native language. With that said, here's what I think of the sentence.


Having said that.

(I am changing this to that because it sounds more natural to me. But you can continue to think of it as this if you wish.)

This is normally encountered as a way of almost contradicting what you have just said and continuing on with something that wouldn't normally follow. You can think of it as "however," "in spite of that," or "despite that."

The path to the left will get me to my destination faster. Having said that, I am going to take the path to the right because it's more scenic.

I know that I should not be eating dessert instead of dinner. Having said that, I am going to order pie.


If you take my example sentences and replace one phrase with another other, you should see that some no longer make sense at all, while others sound slightly less natural.

For example:

Using a magnifying glass to focus sunlight can intensify its normal effects. Having said that, it can be used to burn things.

It sounds a little strange for the second sentence to follow the first in this way.

I know that I should not be eating dessert instead of dinner. That being so, I am going to order pie.

This sounds very strange, and the second sentence doesn't follow the first at all.


Note that with that said can often be replaced with having said that, but the reverse is not true.

First, I need to thank the Academy. Having said that, I'd like to talk a bit about my life and how I got to this point.

While okay, it's a bit less natural than the original.

The path to the left will get me to my destination faster. With that said, I am going to take the path to the right because it's more scenic.

This makes much less sense.

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