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We are leaving on tour to Italy tomorrow for 10 days, after that we tour USA and Canada for two weeks. When we come back we play Fuzzville in Benidorm. Then some gigs in England, Holland, France, Scotland. Our album will be out on Slovenly next fall

why present is used here? Both are future events is it because it is an habit to play both festivals and to tour Usa and Canada for the band or is it because are leaving indicates that these events take place in the future

  • Because there is no future tense in English. The modal verb will is often used with future meaning, but that is not its only meaning, and that is not the only way to convey future meaning. – Colin Fine Jan 18 at 9:15
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are leaving indicates that these events take place in the future

This is correct. The audience knows that these events are taking place in the future.

I'm not sure if there's a good explanation as to why or how this idiom came to exist. It seems to be associated with storytelling. You will see similar constructions describing events in the past:

Yesterday, I was at the convenience store, buying my morning coffee. I'd just finished paying, and this guy comes up to me and says, "hey kid, I like your shirt." I say "thanks!" and walk out the door.

The was and I'd are in the correct tense. They are used to set up the context for the story. Then, when the speaker starts describing the events that occurred, they switch to present tense. The audience can infer the correct tense.

This is ungrammatical and inappropriate for formal writing or speech. But in casual settings it's common (at least in AmE).

  • I'm not convinced that are leaving indicates it's the future. You can also say "We are leaving now" to indicate the present! – Mr Lister Oct 12 '18 at 16:26
  • @MrLister how about "We are leaving now. We arrive in Chicago at 5:30" ? – shadowtalker Oct 12 '18 at 16:33
  • we are leaving tomorrow so this is future! – user5577 Oct 12 '18 at 17:31
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why present is used here? Both are future events is it because it is an habit to play both festivals and to tour USA and Canada for the band or is it because are leaving indicates that these events take place in the future?

So lets take a look at the statement and sort it out

We *are* (will be) leaving on a tour of Italy tomorrow, for 10 days, after that we (will) tour The USA and Canada for two weeks.

When we come back we (will) play Fuzzville in Benidorm. Then (we will play) some gigs in England, Holland, France, Scotland.

Our album will be out on Slovenly next fall.

Here we can see more clearly what is happening The word will has been use in some places but only assumed in others. However the inclusion (assumed or actual) alters how we write the rest of the text. Once we include will then we can use the base form of the main verb.

Note The assumed use of words often happens in spoken English, and whilst there are rules for some occasions, it is more often the speaker/author's assumed familiarity with the subject, by the recipient/reader, which defines the amount of descriptive text. This use of assumed words/phrases make comprehension particularly difficult for Non Native speakers.

Will and shall: form Cambridge English Dictionary

Will and shall are modal verbs. They are used with the base form of the main verb (They will go; I shall ask her). Shall is only used for future time reference with I and we, and is more formal than will. …

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