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http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1122940.shtml

The police report has been read over 100,000 times as of press time. Most netizens said they appreciate the police's work and urged that Zheng be severely punished.

In Oxford or Cambridge Dictionaries, "as of" only has one meaning,

starting from a particular time or date

But in an English to Chinese dictionary, there is another meaning,

截至 "when the statistics time stopped" (by my bad translation.)

And this meaning fits the context ("as of press time") very well.

How do you think about this?

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According to Collins dictionary, as of:

up to, on, or from (a specified time)

I think it can mean differently based on the context.

On; at(used in the simple tense): The project was terminated as of January 1.

from a specified time(used in the future tense): The border will be opened as of January the 1st.

up to; indicate a time at whcich someting ends (used in the perfect tense): (as in your example) The police report has been read over 100,000 times as of press time. // By the time when this news is written, The police report has been read over 100,000 times.

  • How does "... up to press time" make any sense? – Paul Childs Oct 15 '18 at 4:35
  • @PaulChilds My understanding is that "up to press time" means "starting from sometime before( not sure when) till the press time". So, "press time" is a reference for the present perfect tense in this sentence. Correct me if I'm wrong anyway. – dan Oct 15 '18 at 4:48
  • @dan, Haha, I looked 截至 up. The dictionary gives "up to". But I didn't write "up to", just used my bad translation. Because I think native speaker didn't understand "up to" under such circumstance. – Zhang Oct 15 '18 at 5:23
  • @马化腾 Maybe, the usage of "up to" confuses some native speakers. But there is indeed a valid phrase "up to now". Eg. I have heard nothing from him up to now. Let's wait for more inputs then. – dan Oct 15 '18 at 5:44

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