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I'm trying to construct a sentence, but I can't describe it clearly in English according to what I'm really trying to say. First off, the english words that I find malicious-worthy:

  • to jack up (to increase, to raise, and the like...)
  • to jerk off (a sexual reference to a man... you know this)

So, let's say you have used ''jack up'' in a sentence when speaking with a non-native speaker, but you have nagging doubt that it may be rude due to it sounding like ''jerk off''. Then you researched it online, and fortunately, there is no sexual connection to it. And you say:

''I've already looked it up online, carefully and thoroughly, and there is no sexual reference to it in any sort of way wherever website I've visited.

And

''I've already looked it up online, carefully and thoroughly, and there is no sexual reference to it in any way wherever website I've visited.

Are the bold letters really exist in English?, I must have heard them from somewhere. Moreover, the google results can't provide a clear explanation if there is ''in any sort of way'' or "in any way".

P.S.: there is a slight correlation between my question and the other question topics on this website, but those links were asking a different type of query.

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    "wherever website" is not grammatical. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Oct 15 '18 at 16:33
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    There is no reference to it in any sort of way or in any way that makes sense. That's how to use "in any sort of way", for example. Do the bold letters exist? – Lambie Oct 15 '18 at 23:24
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You could say

... with X, there's no reference whatsoever to ________.

... X does not refer in any way to ________

P.S. The phrase in any way is an adjunct of manner, hence "adverbial" in nature. So you could say

The phrase 'jack up' does not refer in any way to activity of a sexual nature.

And the word whatsoever is a descriptive adjunct that means "of any kind", and so it is "adjectival" in nature. So you can say

With 'jack up' there is no reference whatsoever of a sexual nature.

  • ''I've already researched 'jack up' online, carefully and thoroughly, and there is no sexual reference to 'jerk off' whatsoever. -is this what you mean? – John Arvin Oct 15 '18 at 18:00
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    @John Arvin: Please see the P.S. where I elaborate on what I was trying to show you with those two examples, one using the noun reference and the other using the verb refer. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Oct 15 '18 at 19:04

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