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Some searching-result pages give me the prompt of “filled to the brim” but I don't think they share the same meaning. This phrase also occasionally appears on article from The New Yorker so I think it's a fixed expression. Does it mean “be taken good use of” or something else? Thanks.

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  • It would help to know what you were searching for when you found "filled to the brim"
    – J.R.
    Oct 19, 2018 at 16:35

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The two phrases are essentially the same, but while they both indicate something filled to capacity, "packed to the brim" adds the idea of everything being pushed together in order to fit it inside. It is a slightly more intense idiom.

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  • I would also add "stacked to the brim" as another way of saying the same thing. Feb 17, 2022 at 9:26
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"Packed to the brim" and "filled to the brim" are interchangeable. They both mean that something is at maximum capacity. These are both used idiomatically, so there may or may not be a literal physical capacity of the object in question. For example, a movie may be "packed to the brim with laughs."

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