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Here is the sentence.

“I had not made a decison yet, when they asked me what degree in college will (emphasised text) I pursue.

First question: Is it ok to use the word “will” in this context? I mean, its a future word right?

On a different topic, can the past perfect be only used when stating an activity in the past with another activity in the past? or can it be used without an accompanying activity in the past? or could the accompanying activity be replaced by a specific date or duration?

For example:

Example 1: I had studied last night. - Simple past or past perfect?

Example 2: I had studied in college in the 1990’s - Simple past or past perfect?

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  • You can use would in that context, but it should come after the word "I", not before it. – Lawrence Oct 13 '18 at 8:21
  • 'Will' is a 'future word', but you are reporting a question asked in the past. Use 'will' when quoting the exact words They asked "What degree will you pursue?" but not in reported speech They asked what degree I would pursue. – Kate Bunting Oct 13 '18 at 8:57

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