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Take the sentence (1)“The boy is a hardworking student.” The words “a hardworking student” are the complement. There’s no agreement problem in that sentence, it's all singular;(2)“These people are my friends.” , it's all plural.

But what about a sentence like this: (3)Computers are an important research tool.

Why is the subject plural, but the complement is singular?

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    No agreement of number with ascriptive "be" is fairly common: "Our neighbours are a nuisance"; "The people who live there are a minority cult". And likewise with specifying "be", e.g., "Their world-class bowlers are the main asset of the team". And the predicand can be singular while the PC is plural, e.g.,"The only thing we need now is new curtains". – BillJ Oct 19 '18 at 13:05
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We can present any set of things with common attributes as a singular entity, a group.

The three friends were a welcome addition to the photography club.

Even if the only thing they have in common is that they share what is predicated, "a welcome addition", we can do so:

Manny, Moe, and Jack were a welcome addition to the photography club.

Perhaps they joined the club at approximately the same time, the current school year, say. Taken together, they were a welcome addition.

This year, the photography club has almost doubled in size. Manny, Moe, and Jack are a welcome addition.

But we could also say:

This year, the photography club has almost doubled in size. Manny, Moe, and Jack are welcome additions.

The choice of singular or plural reveals how the speaker is regarding the situation, either as a single infusion of new members this year, or as discrete individuals who have joined the club. The semantics of the situation often trumps grammatical number.

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