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... And if the Dursleys were unhappy to have him back for the holidays, it was nothing to how Harry felt.

Normally, I see the phrase "it was nothing to" + sb, but here it's followed by "how Harry felt". So, I don't quite understand what it means. Is it a normal usage? What's the whole sentence trying to convey?

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The sentence might make more sense to you with an added word:

And if the Dursleys were unhappy to have him back for the holidays, it was nothing compared to how Harry felt.

The meaning of the sentence is that Harry was far more unhappy about the situation than the Dursleys.

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    +1. In 19th century texts you will encounter was as nothing to X with the same meaning of "compared to"
    – TimR
    Oct 19, 2018 at 13:13

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