0

I read such a paragraph about Linux Security

Before security became a big issue, these services often just logged in using the root user account. Unfortunately, if an unauthorized person broke into one of these services, he instantly gained access to the system as the root user. To prevent this, now just about every service that runs in background on a Linux server has its own user account to log in with. This way, if a troublemaker compromises a service, he still can’t necessarily get access to the whole system.

About the word "compromise" in the sentence:

if a troublemaker compromises a service, he still can’t necessarily get access to the whole system.

Look up the Oxford dict, I get its meaning, harm

Bring into disrepute or danger by indiscreet, foolish, or reckless behaviour.

Why the author not use "danger" or "harm" directly, since compromise has multiple meaning to mislead.

1

One meaning of "compromise" is "to breach a security system" so it is a precisely correct word to use here. There is nothing misleading, after "danger" or "harm" also have a range of meanings.

It seems that the sense evolution moved from "expose to harm" to "break into".

| improve this answer | |
  • "to breach a security system" is "to break a security system"? – Calculus Oct 25 '18 at 10:53
  • It means to get past a security system. If you can get past a security system, then that system is broken, and the system is compromised. – James K Oct 25 '18 at 10:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.