0

1) I've known her for ten years.

2) I've been knowing her for ten years.

3) I know her for ten years.

4) I knew her for ten years.

Which of these are is/are correct. Explain it- please.

1

1) I've known her for ten years.

This is the normal form in most Englishes for an acquaintance which has lasted for ten years and is still continuing (or very recently was - you might say it if she has died very recently)

2) ? I've been knowing her for ten years.

I suspect this may be current in Indian English, which uses continuous forms for verbs which are not used that way elsewhere. But in any other English I'm aware of, this simply would not be said. "Know" can't take a continuous form.

3) * I know her for ten years.

I don't think this is grammatical in any version of English, though it is a mistake you often hear from speakers of various European languages, translating their own idioms.

4) I knew her for ten years.

This is perfectly normal, for an acquaintance which lasted ten years but is now over.

  • Would it be OK to say: yes, I do know her. – Faizan Oct 27 '18 at 10:33
  • @Faizan: yes, you can say "I know her" or "I do know her", but not "I [do] know her for ten years". – Colin Fine Oct 27 '18 at 10:40
  • Is this grammatically correct, I had known her for 30 years before she died. – Faizan Oct 28 '18 at 4:32
  • @Faizan: yes, that is grammatical and normal. – Colin Fine Oct 28 '18 at 9:26
  • But, why do we use time expressions with present perfect and past perfect... – Faizan Oct 28 '18 at 9:54
0

Actually Present perfect progressive can't be used With non action verbs like

Love ,prefer , know

(State verbs ) you shoud read about it

And sth else

You can use I knew him to refer that Relationship 's gone

You can't use I know him for ten years This's wrong as I aware

Enjoy the answer

  • Please don't use "sth" for "something". – David Siegel Jun 18 at 0:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.