0

“He was pleased,” said Fred.

“Didn't you hear him as we were leaving?

He was asking that bloke from the Daily Prophet if he'd be able to work the fight into his report — said it was all publicity.”

I'm not sure what the word publicity truly mean in this context. I got a list(see below) from the dictionary, but I don't know which one is fit for the context.

What does the whole sentence (it was all publicity) convey?

publicity (pʌˈblɪsɪtɪ) n

  1. (Marketing)

    a. the technique or process of attracting public attention to people, products, etc, as by the use of the mass media

    b. (as modifier): a publicity agent.

  2. (Marketing) public interest resulting from information supplied by such a technique or process

  3. (Marketing) information used to draw public attention to people, products, etc

  4. the state of being public

  • 1
    Perhaps it has something to do with the saying "All publicity is good publicity". – Zak Oct 27 '18 at 17:02
  • @Zak what does that sentence mean? – dan Oct 27 '18 at 19:15
  • 1
    It suggests that it doesn’t matter whether one is famous for good or bad things – all that matters is to stay in the spotlight of public attention. – Zak Oct 27 '18 at 19:46
  • @Zak How would you understand "it was all publicity" here? – dan Oct 27 '18 at 19:58
  • 1
    In this saying, I would understand “All publicity” as “any kind of publicity”. – Zak Oct 27 '18 at 20:05
1

To say that something "was all publicity" usually means that the thing was done solely with the intention of obtaining publicity, that it was only an attempt to get into the public eye.

P.S. There's a saying that describes how it is for those whose success depends on their always being before the public eye: There's no such thing as bad publicity. For example, a "reality TV" mogul might make no distinction between fame and infamy; where there's notoriety, there's propriety.

0

We need more context when you ask these questions about Harry Potter. It seems to me that apparently there was some fight. One might expect a fight to carry some negative consequences for whatever institution this happened at. However, apparently "he" wasn't concerned about that at all; he thinks that the fight will simply be good publicity and nothing else.

  • Sorry, Im not providing enough context. but what you infer is correct. Thanks for your help! – dan Oct 27 '18 at 20:59

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.