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I was watching the acceptance speech of Emilia Clarke at Britannia Awards. I've heard several phrases that I can't understand the meanings of. I didn't find any definition for them through googling.

Here is her speech.

The first one occurs at 1:11. She says:

Be kind to your service everyone. There might be thanking you in a speech someday.

What does it mean "to be kind to your service"?

The second one occurs at 2:45. She says:

So Bafta I just want to thank you for giving me an excuse to thank them in front of more people than, you know, the moco unit of Game of Thrones.

What is the meaning of "moco" here?

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    moco is shorthand for MOtion COntrol (just as, for example, telecom is a shortened form of "telecommunications"). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_control_photography The unit is the team of skilled technicians and artists who do this work for the show. Oct 27, 2018 at 18:55
  • @Tᴚoɯɐuo That's great, thank you. So she shows her gratitude to Bafta for giving her the change of telling them thank you in front of more people instead of just thanking them in front the cameras of the show (game of thrones)
    – helen
    Oct 27, 2018 at 19:02

1 Answer 1

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She's saying,

Be kind to your servers.

And, as your other comment already says:

moco is shorthand for MOtion COntrol (just as, for example, telecom is a shortened form of "telecommunications"). The unit is the team of skilled technicians and artists who do this work for the show. – Tᴚoɯɐuo

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    I believe it's also saying, "They might be thanking you in a speech someday."
    – J.R.
    Oct 28, 2018 at 4:08
  • @J.R. Yes, I agree with you. I also think that she is saying "they" (It seems more grammatical to me), but automatic subtitle under the video writes "there" not "they", and "service" not "servers", so since she has a strong British accent and she is talking a little too fast, I thought maybe I was wrong and the subtitle was correct.
    – helen
    Oct 28, 2018 at 14:16

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