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i have some question about present continuous and present perfect. first is present continuous

if you "are opening" warehouse, good transport links and cheap rental costs will be a priority.

what is the meaning of "are opening"?

You are making warehouse but not open

or

already you built warehouse and are using warehouse?

i'm confused by opening

second is "has been". when i search in cambridge dictionary it says, it's just past not now just like:

a person who was famous, important, admired, or good at something in the past, but is no longer any of these.

but i saw the one sentence

there's been a rise in orders, we need to take on more staff

i think in this case demand of orders still rise now, so they need to more staff. is it right?

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It's best to ask only one question at a time, but I'll try to answer both.

First, the so-called present continuous has several uses, one of which is for future intention.

"If you are opening a warehouse" could mean either:

You are currently in the process of opening a warehouse ("opening" here means something like "making all the arrangements necessary in order to open".)

or

You are planning to open a warehouse in the near future.

Context can usually tell you which of these is meant: the "will" in the consequent of the conditional suggests that it is the "future intention" meaning that applies, though it is still possible for it to mean current activity if the wider context makes that plausible.

2nd question:

There's been a rise in orders.

This does not imply that orders are continuing to rise. It does mean that there is some present relevance: probably that the rise has continued until very recently. (It does not exclude the possibility that the rise will continue in the future, but it does not suggest it either).

  • wow i'm really appreciate for your fast answer, plus i'm sorry about that two questions. – evergreen Oct 29 '18 at 0:40

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