0

These are the sentences:

My umbrella is borrowed by Tom. May I use yours?

My umbrella has been borrowed by Tom. May I use yours?

What is the difference in these two sentences? Thank you

2 Answers 2

1

My umbrella is borrowed by Tom.

is something that I can't imagine a native English speaker saying, except maybe if we are describing a play or a comedy sketch that we perform repeatedly - the use of the present simple is usually for timeless or habitual actions. And even in this meaning, I would expect gets borrowed. Either way, it does not fit with the following May I use yours.

My umbrella has been borrowed by Tom.

uses the present perfect, and indicates that the action happened in the past, and has present relevance. By far the most likely present relevance is that he still has it. This would be the most natural and obvious way to say this (apart from the far more natural choice of the active "Tom has borrowed my umbrella").

0

My umbrella is borrowed by Tom. May I use yours?

My umbrella is currently in Tom's possession, right now.

My umbrella has been borrowed by Tom. May I use yours?

At some ambiguous point in the past, my umbrella has been in Tom's possession.

Note that I'm making no explicit claim as to its current location, but since I'm asking to use yours, I'm implying he still has it.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .