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Which is the correct way of saying that rich countries have higher/currency than developing nations? It goes something like this:

Usually, Currencies of wealthy countries are stronger than less economically advanced nations, thus, rich countries reap the benefits from such exhange rate.

Or

Usually, Currencies of wealthy countries are higher than less economically advanced nations, thus, rich countries reap the benefits from such exhange rate.

Colloquially, stronger currency is correct RIGHT? But it doesn't right to my ear when your main point is the money...

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    Stylistically speaking, it's a very bad idea to include both usually AND often to "weaken" an assertion like this.In your context, stronger is normally used to modify currency, whereas higher is more often used to modify exchange rate. But you will be understood if you use them the other way round. – FumbleFingers Oct 30 '18 at 14:27
  • Currency, in any case, should be plural. Yes, a currency is said to be strong or weak. Not higher or lower. – Lambie Oct 30 '18 at 15:04
  • Done editing as stated from the comments here. – John Arvin Oct 30 '18 at 18:31
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When you say "stronger" or "higher", it doesn't specify what you're trying to say. The amount of the currency might be higher. The buying power in different countries might be stronger.

I'm assuming that you're talking about the value of the money. For example, 1 US dollar is worth more than 20 thousand Vietnamese Dong. In that case, I would say it as:

The value of the currencies of wealthier countries are often higher than less economically advanced nations, thus, rich countries reap the benefits from such advantage.

If you're talking about the purchasing power of the currency, for example the US dollar can be used in many different countries, then I would say it as:

The purchasing power of the currencies of wealthier countries are often stronger than less economically advanced nations, thus, rich countries reap the benefits from such advantage.

Both can be used correctly, it just depends on what you are trying to say.

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    usually and often are sort of redundant. Otherwise, I agree. – Lambie Oct 30 '18 at 15:05
  • Removing one or the other would not affect that. In fact, you can still do it, in which case I can remove my comments. – Lambie Oct 30 '18 at 15:52
  • NICE! This is what I am really trying to say from the sentences above. You are "supercalifragilisticexpialidocious", thx. – John Arvin Oct 30 '18 at 18:38
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    @JohnArvin No problem! Glad I could help. – Puffy Oct 31 '18 at 11:34
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According to the Cambridge Dictionary, currency is

the money that is used in a particular country at a particular time

So, currency is money, and money cannot be high or low: it just is.

An exchange rate (the rate at which the money of one country can be changed for the money of another country) can be high or low, but money can't be.

A currency is strong if it is worth more than other currencies (ie the exchange rate is high.

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