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I do not invoke religion to defend beard, but, attempt to remove many misconceptions that the author seems to be having regarding beard.

Should it be "do not" or "will not"? It implies the forthcoming writing which she was to write (future). What is the meaning of "do not" here?

I think "do not" is for state verbs like "think", "dismiss": mental exertion. "Do not" cannot be used for future stuff. Like "I do not go there" etc... "I do not think so" seems correct.

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    The quote is not grammatical. It should be either "beards" or "the beard". Also can you add more detail why you think "do not" is wrong? – Andrew Oct 30 '18 at 17:21
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In English, a lot depends on the writer's intended point of view (POV). You can see this most often with the use of the verbs "go" and "come":

Will you go to the party with me? (POV is here, where we are, traveling there to the party)

Will you come to the party with me? (POV is there at the party, even if we are not actually in that location yet)

In your question the author's POV is at the time of writing. It doesn't matter whether the argument was written in the past, or will be written in the future, the perspective is as if it is happening now.

One of the more famous examples of this is Mark Antony's speech from the play "Julius Caesar", by William Shakespeare:

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.

Mark Antony is saying that he is here, now, to say something to his fellow Romans. He hasn't said it yet, but his POV is as of the time he will be saying it.

In the same way, in your quoted text the author is saying, "The argument I present at this moment (is for a particular purpose)". In many cases this use is more common than the future tense, especially if the time frame is not important. For example:

I don't say I dislike him because I disagree with him; I say it because he is a dislikable person.

In this sentence, it doesn't matter when said "I dislike him". The point is that my dislike is kind of timeless and ongoing.

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This sounds like the foreword of a book. It likely says do not as the point she is making has already been written. However, using "will not" would not be incorrect either. In this context the two are more or less interchangeable.

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I do not + {bare infinitive} is often used like "I am not" + {present participle}.

When the verb is a verb of saying (say, invoke, mention, etc) the locution leads to the reason for saying what is being said now, at this very moment, after dispelling some false notions the listener may have. The emphasis is on what is happening in the present instant just as it can be with the present continuous.

You should spend more time with your children. I do not say this to make you feel bad but to give you some good advice.

You should spend more time with your children. I am not saying this to make you feel bad but to give you some good advice.

A slightly less informal version of negation:

You should spend more time with your family. I say this not to make you feel bad but to give you some good advice.

You should spend more time with your family. I am saying this not to make you feel bad but to give you some good advice.

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