1

I am a bit confused about verbs in a main clause and verbs in a relative clause. Do these verbs need to be in a same form (present tense/past tense)?

Case 1

I am the student who met you yesterday.

or

I was the student who met you yesterday.

Case 2

He is one of the teachers who taught me English.

or

He was one of the teachers who taught me English.

Can someone please explain to me when is the right time to use each sentence or is it necessary for these verbs to be in a same form?

  • Both tenses are fine for both contexts, and there's not really any subtle difference in meaning. But note that we wouldn't use present tense in #2 if the teacher was no longer alive. – FumbleFingers Oct 30 '18 at 17:46
2

I am the student who met you yesterday.

or

I was the student who met you yesterday.

Since people's identities generally constant the same over time, both of these sentences mean the same thing. The different tenses of the first verb could subtly emphasize different things, i.e. the person's identity yesterday vs today, but with no other context, there is no difference.

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