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Raindrops the size of bullets thundered on the castle windows for days on end; the lake rose, the flowerbeds turned into muddy streams and Hagrid's pumpkins swelled to the size of garden sheds.

My question is how we should take "Raindrops the size of bullets" from the grammar standpoint. Is it a noun phrase "the size of bullets" modifying another noun word 'Raindrops'? Or it's kind of omission for Raindrops which had the size of bullets?

How should we understand it from the grammar standpoint?

-- From Harry Potter.

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    The noun phrase "the size of bullets" is a post-head modifier of "raindrops". Leaving aside appositives, post-head modifiers with noun phrase form are limited to those denoting age, size, or similar properties. Other examples include "a woman my age", "a rug this colour", "someone your own size". – BillJ Nov 1 '18 at 7:21
  • @BillJ I agree. That comment has all of the makings of a good answer, except for being in the wrong text field! – Tashus Nov 1 '18 at 13:03
  • @Tashus Have just posted it as an answer! – BillJ Nov 1 '18 at 16:08
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Raindrops the size of bullets thundered on the castle windows for days on end ...

The noun phrase "the size of bullets*" is a post-head modifier of "raindrops". Leaving aside appositives, post-head modifiers with the form of a noun phrase are limited to those denoting age, size, or similar properties.

Other examples include "a woman my age", "a rug this colour", "someone your own size".

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