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[i carry your heart with me(i carry it in]
BY E. E. CUMMINGS
i carry your heart with me(i carry it in
my heart)i am never without it(anywhere
i go you go,my dear;and whatever is done
by only me is your doing,my darling)
                                      i fear
no fate(for you are my fate,my sweet)i want
no world(for beautiful you are my world,my true)
and it’s you are whatever a moon has always meant <-------------
and whatever a sun will always sing is you

here is the deepest secret nobody knows
(here is the root of the root and the bud of the bud
and the sky of the sky of a tree called life;which grows
higher than soul can hope or mind can hide)
and this is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart

i carry your heart(i carry it in my heart)

source


and it’s you are whatever a moon has always meant

I've never seen such a grammatical form before and I'm inquisitive about where it comes from and what does the sentence mean although I might have a dim idea.

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e e cummings is famous for not merely breaking grammatical convention, but smashing it to a bloody screaming pulp with a hammer. Basically, he's combining multiple sentence fragments together into one place, evoking images of complete sentences without actually writing any complete sentences.

Please note that reading poetry can be a very personal experience, and multiple interpretations can be valid. That said, let's analyze this a little.

and it’s you are whatever a moon has always meant

As you can tell, this is not grammatical. But it does contain two complete thoughts which each work together.

and it's you

you are whatever a moon has always meant

If you wanted to make this grammatical and easier to understand, you might be able to get away with adding a single word, "who".

And it's you who are whatever a moon has always meant.

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