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I have come across this use of the phrase in this video. Here is the piece:

So if you have been studying English pronunciation at all, I am sure you have heard about this schwa sound.

As the Cambridge Dictionary puts it, the phrase is used in negatives for emphasis. The root of my confusion is that the sentence is not neative. Could you give a similar phrase that would have the same meaning in the sentence.

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    If you have been studying English pronunciation even a little bit. There are many contexts where at all doesn't have to be in a "negating" context. For example, Descartes said that if he knew anything at all, he knew that he existed. Nov 4, 2018 at 16:58
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    @FumbleFingers As per the Cambridge Dictionary definition, it is applicable in both negatives and questions. You example is a question.
    – Omegastick
    Nov 5, 2018 at 2:15
  • @Omegastick: At all costs we should avoid being too restrictive in our definition of "acceptable usage contexts" for the collocation. :) Besides which, at best you could say the Descartes example is a "rhetorical question", since no-one would dispute that he did know something! Nov 5, 2018 at 13:42
  • @FumbleFingers You'll find that the phrase at all costs is actually using a different construction. To show that, the all can be replaced with any (at any cost). You can't do that with the phrase at all.
    – Omegastick
    Nov 8, 2018 at 1:27
  • @Omegastick: The train now leaving platform 7 will be calling at all stations to London Victoria. As I said before, there are many contexts where at all doesn't have to be in a "negating" context. Pointing out that any examples thereof must inevitably involve "a different construction" (by whatever logic) doesn't really get us anywhere. Nov 8, 2018 at 13:39

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If you read a bit more carefully (I missed it too at first) the Cambridge Dictionary says "used to make negatives and questions stronger".

This case is actually a question because of the if:

So if you have been studying English pronunciation at all, I am sure you have heard about this schwa sound.

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