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If have two networking devices using a link connected them, but the networking between them can not switch data to each other. I mean the physical is connected, but they do not meet the protocol so can not traffic data, which word can I use to adjective this scenario ? I think I can not use "in-connected", because they are linked in the physical aspect.

Which adjective can I use for describe the networking can not work?

  • Are you trying to say that the network itself is composed of incompatible protocols—or is the network using one protocol but the clients using a different one? I would say that there are parts of the network that are unable to communicate with each other. Or that the network isn't using a consistent protocol. Figuratively, you might say that the network (or infrastructure) is schizophrenic, but that's not a good technical term—and it doesn't necessarily mean "uncommunicative". (Uncommunicative is better, but still not a good technical term for this situation.) – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Nov 5 '18 at 9:55
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    I suggest 'incompatible'. There are other words like 'matched' but the latter assumes things can be fixed by pairing the devices. 'Incompatible' suggests that there is no way to fix the problem unless a third device is introduced which translates from one protocol to the other. – chasly from UK Nov 5 '18 at 10:15
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The word is incompatible.

I've made my comment into an answer. The term compatibility is ubiquitous in technology. For example:

Interfacing Incompatible Protocols Using Interface Process Generation

Abstract: During system design, one or more portions of the system may be implemented with standard components that have a fixed pin structure and communication protocol. This paper described a new technique, interface process generation, for interfacing standard components that have incompatible protocols.

https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/1586749

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