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I wonder the reason why it has been here used FUTURE PERFECT!

The building is hardly there to satisfy the needs of structure but, whatever its purpose or plan, structural needs will have had a vital hand in shaping its form.

Moreover, what does "structural needs will have had a vital hand in shaping its form" mean?

Source: Understanding Buildings: A Multidisciplinary Approach

  • Does this statement assert that "the building is hardly there" or that it is not "there to satisfy the needs of the structure"? Could be interpreted both ways. Either way, FUTURE PERFECT indicates that this building is not yet built. – Metagrapher Mar 5 '14 at 9:24
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The phrase "will have had" means something that has not happened yet, but after the event looking back one would be able to say "has had". This tense describes a past that will occur in the future, and is usually speculative or hypothetical in nature.

In this specific case, this statement "structural needs will have had a vital hand in shaping its form" means "structural needs are vital in shaping its form", it's just put into a future tense because the building does not exist yet, but the author is supposing that when the building does exist, then these things would be true of the past.

I will simplify the tenses for you:

original

The building is hardly there to satisfy the needs of structure but, whatever its purpose or plan, structural needs will have had a vital hand in shaping its form.

revised

The building is there to satisfy only minimal needs of the structure, if at all. However, the structural needs are vital in shaping the form of the building, which has yet to be built.

Another example, "Once I finish this pancake I will have had 5 pancakes."

It's a sort of future retrospective tense, where one is talking about a past tense that has not yet occurred, but is expected to occur. In the case you asked about, it introduces the information that the building does not yet exist, or that some other related event is still yet to take place in the future.

  • Thank you so much. FANTABULOUS. GREAT. AMAZING. YOUR EXPLANATIONS ARE GREAT. THANK YOU SO MUCH. – nima Mar 8 '14 at 4:58
  • And, would you more the following?a past tense that has not yet occurred – nima Mar 8 '14 at 5:03
  • These colours will have had an important for this wall. It means: the wall has not yet coloured, but it is expected to colour. Is my explanation right? if so, would you tell me when/where do you prefer to use such a statement? – nima Mar 8 '14 at 5:35
  • And, why the write has not said will have instead of will have had? – nima Mar 8 '14 at 5:35
  • Or what is the difference between will have and will have had in this situation? – nima Mar 8 '14 at 5:36

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