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Let's say you have downloaded an 'adblocker' app on your phone. Then, when you are testing it, it's not working, you are now grumpy due to that because you feel that you have been fooled by the app's description that it will work. You say:

"It doesn't work as what they say it is!"

Is this the correct phrase/expression in English?

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No, it is not correct for quite a few reasons. Foremost, there should be a verb after they. Second, work (in the sense of 'to function') is a DO-verb not an IS-verb, so is should be does or should | would (work). Finally, what is incorrect with work.

work how ...

do what ...

Possible correct phrases:

It doesn't work how they say it does.

It doesn't work as they say (it does).

It doesn't work how they said it would.

It isn't working as they said it would.

It doesn't work as they said it would.

You could substitute should for would.

There are other ways as well, using DO:

It doesn't do what they say (it does).

It doesn't do what they say it should.

The phrases in parentheses can be omitted.

  • Hello, can you say this: "It doesn't work the way they said"? – John Arvin Nov 6 '18 at 16:30
  • Yes, that is good. "the way they said" is another form of "as they said" or "how they said". – Tᴚoɯɐuo Nov 6 '18 at 20:22
  • Hope you don't mind, I just want to make this expression as clear as day according to what I am really trying to say (you know that feeling when you can't spell it out, kinda it's on the tip of your tongue?). This is the last: "It's not functioning similar to what they said from their description" how about it now? – John Arvin Nov 6 '18 at 21:17
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    That is rather verbose. "similar to what" could be reduced to "as". "from" should be "in". It's not working as the description says it does. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Nov 6 '18 at 21:26
  • Hello, let's this is the improved phrasing compared to the previous entries. How about this: "it's not working the same as described" -avoiding verbosity yet effective- – John Arvin Feb 4 at 1:38

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