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"Shun them not only in reality, but even in appearance, if you would be well received in good company; for people will always be shy of receiving a man who comes from a place where the plague rages, let him look ever so healthy."

From LETTERS TO HIS SON By the EARL OF CHESTERFIELD on the Fine Art of becoming a MAN OF THE WORLD and a GENTLEMAN

Semantically, the highlighted part looks like a verb phrase with the subject being plague, I guess, but in that case, the verb let seems to be missing -s and a coordinator.

Please elaborate me about the status of the part.

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This is an archaic usage of the word "let." You will never see it in modern English.

In this usage, "let him look" means "though he may look."

  • Thank you so much for being such a great help. I vaguely thought "though" should be needed semantically. I didn't know that let was used in such a way. – NAM Nov 7 '18 at 3:25

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