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"This is what Dumbledore sends his defender! A songbird and an old hat! ..."

I don't understand the grammar of that sentence because it engaged two objects for the verb sends: what and his defender. Maybe, This is the defender that Dumbledore sends looks more reasonable. Any thoughts?

2 Answers 2

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But there is no comma after 'sends'. 'the defenders' are the people Dumbledore is sending something to, in this case, a songbird and an old hat.

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  • So, you meant "his defender" refers to 'Harry' in this case. I see it. Originally, I thought "his defender" refers to "A songbird and an old hat". Thanks!
    – dan
    Nov 8, 2018 at 4:20
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I think that the preposition "to" has been omitted. I guess that Dumbledore's defender is Harry, I don't remember exactly, and he has sent to him a songbird and an old hat.

There are multiple questions about this subject in relation with the verb send in the English Language and Usage site.

https://english.stackexchange.com/q/410513/217656

https://english.stackexchange.com/q/372235/217656

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