0

Regarding the usage of the relative pronoun "which", after it, do you use singular verb or plural?

”Historic buildings enliven the memories of how people lived in the past, which make each country fascinating as every nation has different stories to tell.

Or

Historic buildings enliven the memories of how people lived in the past, which makes each country fascinating as every nation has different stories to tell.

1

The question is really whether the subject of the verb to make is singular or plural.

To answer the question, reduce the subject to its essence:

Historic buildings enliven the memories of how people lived in the past

to

Buildings enliven the memories of how people lived

to

Buildings enliven memories

If buildings enliven memories is interpreted as a process, it would take the singular makes.

If buildings enliven memories is interpreted as a series of events, it would take the plural make.

So it really amounts to the way you see it.

  • Thx for the answer. If what I'm trying to say is a fact, so it's neither 'a process' nor 'a series of events' isn't it? Which one should I use then? makes or make? – John Arvin Nov 9 '18 at 20:39
  • 1
    @JohnArvin "(The fact that) buildings enliven memories makes each country fascinating...." – Ronald Sole Nov 9 '18 at 22:55
1

If the subject of "makes" is the entire phrase "Historic buildings enliven the memories of how people lived in the past", then it's singular, because we have one (singular) fact that is making someone. For this to be plural, the subject would have to be "historic buildings", but then it should be "Historic buildings enliven the memories of how people lived in the past and make ...".

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.