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There were more than 10,000 tickets for Adele's concert in LA, all of them ______ within 32 seconds.

A. sold out
B. selling out
C. to sell out
D. having sold out

I don't understand why the answer is A instead of D. Can anyone help me to analyze this sentence? From my perspective, this question is referred to two grammar points, one is non-finite forms of verb and another is the construction for active voice to substitute passive voice(difference between sold out and be sold out).

There (Subject) were (Predicate)more than 10,000(Adverbial)tickets(Object)for Adele's concert in LA(Adverbial), all of them ______ (Predicate)within 32 seconds(Adverbial).

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I think you have two options:

There were more than 10,000 tickets for Adele's concert in LA, all of them sold out within 32 seconds.

is correct. Keep in mind that "sold out" is a moment in time when the last ticket sold. So simple past is sufficient.

You could use:

There were more than 10,000 tickets for Adele's concert in LA, all of them having sold within 32 seconds

Here, we are following the ticket sales, which did occur over 32 seconds. But again, "sold out" only describes the condition when the last ticket is sold.

  • Thank you for your answer. And I am still confusing why the second sentence include "having" before "sold"? – user1234567 Nov 14 '18 at 1:24
  • Each ticket being sold (sale completed) over a period of time. Like "Having eaten all the candy, I had to go to the store to get more." – user3169 Nov 14 '18 at 5:30
  • Btw You said "So simple past is sufficient." However, I think “sold out” is not simple past tense of "sell out" but past participle instead because a sentence can only have one main verb and nonfinite verbs contain three forms which are infinitives, participles and gerunds. So when I think about sold out as the simple past tense of sell out, it should be "There were more than 10,000 tickets for Adele's concert in LA, and all of them sold out (simple past tense) within 32 seconds." – user1234567 Nov 14 '18 at 13:49

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