1

It sounds too convoluted. I thought about "piss on their two feet", but not sure this is more common than "piss while standing up".

"Men piss on their two feet."

"Men piss while standing up."

Is there a way to get rid of the while. It sounds unnatural.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Jason Bassford Supports Monica, Eddie Kal, Tim Pederick, Varun Nair, Hellion Nov 16 '18 at 22:24

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  • No, not really. "Men stand to pee" is another option, though, which invites humorous commentary such as "Women can't stand to pee". – Andrew Nov 12 '18 at 23:36
  • Isn't it weird that there are like only a few way of saying this? – JJJJ Nov 13 '18 at 0:00
  • 1
    @JJJJ - I can think of many ways to express this, but few of them sound “natural” or “common,” because it’s simply an obvious but little-discussed fact. – J.R. Nov 13 '18 at 1:37
  • The sentence is valid without the word while: "Men piss standing up." – LawrenceC Nov 13 '18 at 17:16
3

Don't Say This

"Men piss on their two feet."

This sounds like someone is urinating on their own feet. Unless that's what you're trying to say, I wouldn't use this construction at all.

Simple and Complex Constructions

If you're just trying to keep it short and colloquial, it's probably fine to say:

"Men pee standing up."

However, "piss" and (to a lesser extent) "pee" are somewhat vulgar in American English. More polite phrases might be:

  • Men often urinate while standing.
  • Men often stand while urinating.

Since men can urinate while sitting, you might also provide more context to explain the point of your sentence. For example:

Urinals allow men to pee standing up without the hassle of raising the toilet seat.

Or you may be trying to draw a contrast between men and women, or men's and women's restroom facilities. For example:

Men typically urinate standing up, which is why men's restrooms usually have urinals installed. Women typically urinate while sitting down, which is why women's restrooms have stalls but no urinals.

Ultimately, the choice of phrasing depends a great deal on your intent and your audience. Context matters!

4

"Men piss standing up" seems to be a fine enough sentence to me. Google Ngrams has plenty of hits for that, but none for "piss while standing up".

  • 1
    "Men piss while standing up" almost sounds like they piss while in the act of changing position from sitting/reclining to standing. – miltonaut Nov 13 '18 at 4:20
  • (and "piss on their two feet" gives me an impression of wet and stinky feet) – muru Nov 13 '18 at 4:34
0

The "up" can be omitted: "piss while standing" is more concise, and as another pointed out, more specifically conveys the relatively static poise.

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