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"The seventh and final book series is due to be published soon and will definitely create as much if not more interest than all the other 6"

Could you tell me the meaning of 'due to'? Does it mean 'expected to'?

And about the rest of the sentence '..as much if not more..' I can't understand the context because when some book is not more interest than other so it wouldn't be published as much!!! Right?

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Two questions, so two answers :)

is due to be {X}

This means that it is time for {X} to occur. {X} is almost always a verb in the past tense. It's as if the writer is jumping forward in time to look back at an event that has not happened yet, but will happen soon.

  • He is due to be promoted - in the near future, he will be promoted
  • The railway is due to be rebuilt - in the near future, the railway will be rebuilt

When you see or use "is due to be", it means that the event must be happening soon. This follows the normal meaning of saying that something is "due".

as much if not more

This is a common construction in English. It means that the thing you're speaking about will definitely be as great as previously, and will probably be even greater.

In your sentence, the author is saying that there is no chance of the interest in this book being lower than it was in the others. I've expanded the sentence, here:

  • there will be as much interest in the book as there was in the previous 6. If not, there will be more interest in this book than there was in the previous 6.

This is clear, but it's very repetitive, so we can use this wording instead:

  • there will be as much if not more interest in this book than there was in the previous 6.

Note that the rest of the sentence agrees with "more", rather than "as much" (it says "... than there was in the previous 6", rather than " ... as there was in the previous 6")

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