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Is the below sentence correct?

He is still working here for the last 3 years.

Without a second thought, I typed in an important form as below-

He has been & still working here for the last 3 years.

What does this mean? Any ambiguity? Or is it redundancy? Is it correct first of all? Should I have to retype it again?

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No, those constructions are ungrammatical.

When the verb is in the present, the temporal reference for still is the present moment following upon a stretch of time immediately preceding:

He is still working here now | today after three years on the job.

or a past reference point when the verb is in the past:

He was still working here then | at that time after three years on the job.

for the last three years refers to a stretch of time extending from a point in time three years ago up until the present moment, and thus it partners well with the present perfect:

He has been working here [now] for the last three years.

We can also shift the present moment to a reference moment in the past, and use the past perfect:

He had been working there [then] for the last three years.

  • Unfortunately, I noticed it only after I took out the print of the matter on the letterhead & got it signed! It will be very difficult now to retype it as I cant get an extra letterhead. Could it turn out to be correct if I modify it as- 'He has been & still working here.(for the last 3 years)'. -ie by somehow introducing brackets & full stops in the available space between letters? – CuriousMind Nov 15 '18 at 14:49

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