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Jair Bolsonaro is the new president of Brazil. Indeed, this last election provoked a division of opinions among voters.

In this phrase is normal use "in fact" or "indeed"? These words are synonymous?

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Definition of in fact

Definition of indeed

Neither are applicable here, in my opinion. They are used for emphasising or countering a point. The sentence "Jair Bolsonaro is the new president of Brazil" has no mention or implication of how divided the voters are. Best just to leave them out.

Jair Bolsonaro is the new president of Brazil. This last election provoked a division of opinions among voters.

  • Thanks Omegastick. Could you give me an example of using these expressions? What the diference between both? – Bráulio Figueiredo Nov 17 '18 at 12:18
  • In fact: "A lot of people say Keanu Reeves is a great actor, but I'm not sure I agree. In fact, I find him quite dull." No offense intended to Mr Reeves. Indeed: "Do you think Keanu Reeves is a good actor?" "Oh, I do indeed." – Omegastick Nov 17 '18 at 12:36

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