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Can the phrase 'even more' stand for 'more importantly'? For example, 'If you drive while drunk, you could lose your license, but even more importantly, you could kill someone.' Is it correct to use 'even more' instead of 'more importantly' in this sentence? 'If you drive while drunk, you could lose your license, but even more, you could kill someone.'

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No, in my opinion this is not a natural phrase in English and the reader is left asking 'even more what?'

A closer range of synonyms for 'more importantly' your example phrase might be:

If you drive while drunk, you could lose your license, but above all, you could kill someone.

If you drive while drunk, you could lose your license, but what's more, you could kill someone.

If you drive while drunk, you could lose your license, but moreover, you could kill someone.

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