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Today in class we studied participle clauses. Students were asked to transform with sentence "When I am asked about the experiment, I encourage other people to have a try." The correct textbook answer was "When asked about the experiment, I encourage other people to have a try."

Some students believe that "Being asked about the experiment, I encourage other people to have a try" also has the same meaning. To me, it sounds like "being asked" can't refer to a general situation or a repeated action - to my mind it sounds more similar to "Having been asked"

So, can "Being asked about the experiment, I encourage other people to have a try" actually be correct in the sense of "Whenever I am asked about the experiment, I encourage..." And if not, could you help me understand why exactly it is incorrect?

Thank you so very much.

  • We usually understand the construction Being X, [subject] did / does Y as meaning Because [subject] was /is X, he did / does Y - the implication being that [subject] is / was always (timelessly, continuously) X. In contexts where the intended meaning is When / If [subject] was /is X..., we very often precede the continuous participle by one of those highlighted words, or just a simple preposition: On being asked... – FumbleFingers Nov 19 '18 at 14:05
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Some native speakers might say (or more likely write) being asked when their intended meaning is "when asked".

Being asked by tourists for directions, the locals will intentionally guide them in the wrong direction.

Instead of combining two participles, the present and the past, it is simpler to use when:

When asked by tourists for directions, the locals will intentionally guide them in the wrong direction.

But being and when are both unnecessary:

Asked by tourists for directions, the locals will intentionally guide them in the wrong direction.

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