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But one does not parade the fact that one is All-Knowing. I frequently act as though I am not possessed of the Inner Eye, so as not to make others nervous.

I'm not sure if I have gotten the meaning right. As I understand, it means: one does not show off the fact: he knows all the things. Is my understanding correct?

Another thing I'm not sure is if the first 'one' and the second 'one' refer to the same person. If so, shouldn't we use 'he' to refer back to the first 'one'? But one does not parade the fact that he is All-Knowing.

What does the sentence convey exactly?

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    In the game of poker, one does not parade the fact that one has a straight flush. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Nov 22 '18 at 14:37
  • @Tᴚoɯɐuo Maybe, they do with a full-house? :) – dan Nov 22 '18 at 14:46
  • Only if they want to win a small pot. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Nov 22 '18 at 14:47
  • There is no need for all-knowing and inner eye to be in caps unless you mean: God. Is this poker or daily life? That use of caps, though used by the current US "president", sounds like German usage. I believe that German capitalizes certain nouns. – Lambie Nov 22 '18 at 16:32
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You are right: "parade" in this context means "show off".

You are also right that this sentence would be clearer if the second "one" was replaced by "he" or "she", but even better would be:

"one does not parade the fact that they are All-Knowing"

because this does not involve any assumptions about gender (he or she).

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    No, one is correct in both instances in the first sentence. You don't change pronouns in mid-stream (in the middle of a sentence using the pronoun one.) One does not parade the fact one is all-knowing. There is no need to change the pronoun at all. – Lambie Nov 22 '18 at 16:33
  • @Lambie: It might be a bit "odd" to switch from one to she, but it's perfectly natural to switch to he or they - as will be the case with many/most written instances of If one knows that he (is all-knowing, or whatever). I think many people would prefer to do this, if only because one one isn't necessarily "pretentious", but the more it's repeated, the more it becomes so. – FumbleFingers Nov 22 '18 at 18:07
  • They makes it even more ambiguous. One=a person,they=plural people who are all knowing. No one would default to the gender assumption here. And if they did, it would be just as bad. – Lambie Nov 22 '18 at 19:31
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Original sentence and stylistic considerations in formal writing.

1) But one does not parade the fact that one is all-knowing. I frequently act as though I am not possessed of the Inner Eye, so as not to make others nervous.

This is formal writing. Use of one triggers that interpretation. Ergo, there is no reason to switch pronouns beside the issue of ambiguity. Please read on.

2) But one does not parade the fact that he (or she) is all-knowing. I frequently act as though I am not possessed of the Inner Eye, so as not to make others nervous.

As the second sentence has I/I, it is stylistically better to keep one/one in the first sentence. Also, if you switch the second one to he or she, it could refer to some else,thereby introducing ambiguity. What I mean is this: the he could refer to a person other than the person referred to as one, the subject pronoun.

It is conceivable to read 2), therefore, as: But one [referring to oneself or someone else] does not parade the fact that he [John] is all-knowing. I frequently act as though I am not possessed of the Inner Eye, so as not to make others nervous.

The best way to contrast the two sentences is: one/one and I/I.

"One should be careful of her manners in the forums." Hmm, that makes my point.

I left inner eye in caps to emphasize it.

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