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In the following video at 1:16, does he say a way or away?
https://youtu.be/4O9o4CKTGzQ

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  • Really? I think you should have done the work of attempting to write out the sentence before getting us to do the work. Just saying....
    – Lambie
    Nov 23 '18 at 15:11
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    @Lambie: You have a point, but writing out the sentence without going through the context doesn't help you answer this question: you need to see this short video. I wish they would allow embedding videos in this forum.
    – Mike
    Nov 24 '18 at 7:05
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It is like a finger pointing away to the moon. ✔

Concentrate neither on the finger nor on the way! In this video, Bruce Lee emphasizes the fact that you should concentrate on your goal only. It can be skillful martial arts or any other thing you aim at.

enter image description here

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The video has subtitles:

"Don't think! Feel! It is like a finger pointing a way to the moon."

It's possible of course that the subtitles are wrong.


"A way" and "away" are pronounced identically but they have different meanings.

A finger pointing a way to the moon.

This means a finger that indicates a method or path by which the moon can be reached. It has a more figurative sense.

A finger pointing away to the moon.

This means a finger that points in the opposite direction of something else and towards the moon. (There is an implied pointing away from something and to the moon.) It has a more literal sense.


In his speech, Bruce Lee is talking about how to understand or feel an essential quality or attitude that leads to skilful martial arts. So, when he talks about a finger pointing to the moon it's a metaphor. The moon stands for skilful martial arts, and he's talking about how to reach that destination. By that interpretation, he should be saying "a way," which is indeed what the subtitles indicate.

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  • Nice job of doing all the work. The OP could have at least attempted that. Why should be have to go to other sites and listen to recordings?
    – Lambie
    Nov 23 '18 at 15:12

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