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I want to reinforce the exact difference between these two prepositions used in the same sentence.

I'll go for a walk in the seaside.

I'll go for a walk at the seaside.

Is it grammatically wrong to say that we can use both?

1 Answer 1

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There is no grammatical question here: it is simply one of usage.

At the seaside is idiomatic: in the seaside is not.

Go for a walking is not idiomatic: go for a walk is.

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  • So, can't I use ''in''?
    – Enzo
    Commented Nov 20, 2018 at 17:02
  • It's grammatical, and it would be understood. But it's not what a native speaker would say.
    – Colin Fine
    Commented Nov 20, 2018 at 17:04
  • @Enzo If you use in people will notice and write it off as a non-native speaker error.
    – Dan Bron
    Commented Nov 20, 2018 at 17:06
  • @enzo I'd say the most common preposition is along the seaside or alongside the (beach / shore / sea). People don't normally go for a walk at the seaside either. (Although it's a lot more common than in the seaside, which is simply bizarre.) However, people do go for a seaside walk, which dispenses with a preposition altogether. Commented Nov 20, 2018 at 19:15
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    Walking 'in the seaside' would get your feet wet.
    – amI
    Commented Nov 20, 2018 at 19:41

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