1

Russian energy giant Gazprom meanwhile warned the government in Kiev that it would cut off gas exports if it did not settle a $1.89bn (£1.13bn) debt. In 2009, Gazprom halted supplies to Ukraine in a move that caused shortages across Europe.

(Source: BBC News)

What does the first and second "it" refer to in this context? I think the first "it" refers to Gazprom and the second refers to Kiev – am I right?

  • 1
    In the future, put your question in your question, not it the title of your question. Moreover, it's good practice to (a) put your quotes in a "quote box", by adding a ">" character to the beginning of the line, and (b) provide a link to the article, so that others can read more context, if desired. (Sometimes, it's impossible to figure out the meaning of a sentence unless one can also read the previous sentence or paragraph. Don't make people here go search for the article with a search engine.) – J.R. Mar 8 '14 at 10:03
  • Thank you so much to edit. Actually the previous paragraph had nothing to do with this. Here ut is : The head of the team, Valeriy Sushkevych, said they would participate, but warned: "If something major happens, Ukraine will leave the Games immediately".Russian energy giant Gazprom meanwhile warned the government in Kiev that it would cut off gas exports if it did not settle a $1.89bn (£1.13bn) debt. In 2009, Gazprom halted supplies to Ukraine in a move that caused shortages across Europe. – hamed Mar 8 '14 at 10:12
  • The previous paragraph may not have had any relevance in this instance, but it's still a good general practice to include the link. Some might want to refer back to the original just to verify that previous text doesn't change the meaning. – J.R. Mar 8 '14 at 10:19
1

You read it correctly. The first "it" refers to Gazprom, and the second "it" refers to the government in Kiev (Ukraine).

According to the news, Ukraine still owes Gazprom $1.89bn (£1.13bn), and unless this debt was settled, Gazprom would cut off the gas exports to Ukraine.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.