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"Splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen makes spacecraft fuel, so ice-rich asteroids could become interplanetary refuelling stations."

What is the main idea of the sentence (before so) "Splitting water makes fuel" or (after so) "Asteroids could become stations"?

  • How do you usually decide what is the "main idea" of a sentence? What criteria separate the "main" idea from supporting ideas? You will have to add more detail to explain what you want, otherwise we can't really answer. – Andrew Nov 26 '18 at 20:17
  • I love football, because it is funny. In this example the main idea is that i love football and the second part explains why. – Mətin Vüqaroğlu Nov 27 '18 at 7:53
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The "main idea" is not an exactly defined concept. It is also not an aspect of English grammar. So you will need to think about this sentence in context.

Could you omit either part without changing the main point of the paragraph? In this case, I suspect the author is talking about interplanetary travel. That would make "ice-rich asteroids could become interplanetary refuelling stations" the main part (and the first part is just an explanation of a detail).

It is possible (but unlikely) that the paragraph is about making fuel, in which case the main part is "Splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen makes spacecraft fuel" (and the second part is just an example of why this is important).

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  • Water ice from the moon’s poles could be sent to astronauts on the International Space Station for drinking or as a radiation shield. Splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen makes spacecraft fuel, so ice-rich asteroids could become interplanetary refuelling stations. – Mətin Vüqaroğlu Nov 27 '18 at 7:56

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