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In the sentence below, is "on" an adverb and is "another" a quantifier? I thought they were but I am unsure. Please help as soon as possible. I am willing to learn how to identify these tough parts of speech.

Here is the sentence:

It’s red and it has a broken seat but we found another seat to put on it.

  • Thanks for the help! I cleaned the question as best I could. I figured I needed more help with the phrases, clauses, and sentence structure. – Ballinger101 Nov 27 '18 at 18:05
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This is a run-on sentence:

It’s red and it has a broken seat but we found another seat to put on it.

At the very least, there should be a comma before "but", because a new subject is introduced.

It's red and it has a broken seat, but we found another seat to put on it.

The breakdown with this change would be:

Sentence Structure:

Subject 1 ("It", repeated twice) + compound predicate ("'s red and... ...has a broken seat")

Subject 2 ("we") + predicate ("found another seat to put on it")

Phrases:

"It" (subject 1), "it" (subject 1 repeated), "a broken seat", "we" (subject 2), "another seat", and "it" are noun phrases.

"‘s red", "has a broken seat", and "found another seat to put on it" are verb phrases.

"on it" is a prepositional phrase.

"red" is an adjective phrase.

"to put on it" is an infinitive phrase.

Clauses:

Two independent ("It is red and it has a broken seat" and "but we found another seat to put on it")


Stylistically, I would also change the first clause by removing the repeated subject "it." Another alternative would be to add a comma to produce three independent clauses.

It's red and has a broken seat, but we found another seat to put on it.

or

It's red, and it has a broken seat, but we found another seat to put on it.

The second alternative would require a change in analysis, since we now have three independent clauses, three subjects (the second "it" is a new subject because it is in a separate independent clause), and no compound predicate.

  • Thank you SO VERY MUCH! It's red and it has a broken seat but we found another seat to put on it- would "has" be an auxiliary verb? What about "another," would this be a quantifier as a determiner? Lastly, do you believe that "on" in the prepositional phrase "on it" is an adverb or a preposition considering it's a prep phrase? I got very confused with this sentence as it is a run-on. Thank you!! – Ballinger101 Nov 27 '18 at 22:36
  • @Ballinger101 You're welcome. Unfortunately, that is a bit too much to answer in a quick comment, but you can post additional questions if you like. Here are tips that can help you get better answers: ell.stackexchange.com/help/how-to-ask – Tashus Nov 28 '18 at 1:17
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    Sorry! I have to wait two days in order to ask another question! – Ballinger101 Nov 28 '18 at 1:19

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