1

Sarah and Ann’s sister is/are away on an important assignment.

closed as off-topic by Eddie Kal, user3169, Andrew, Hellion, Glorfindel Dec 15 '18 at 11:40

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question should include more details than have been provided here. Please edit to add the research you have done in your efforts to answer the question, or provide more context. See: Details, Please." – Eddie Kal, user3169, Andrew, Hellion, Glorfindel
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 5
    The sentence is ambiguous. Is one person (who is sister of both Sarah and Ann) away, or are two people (one named Sarah and the other only known as Ann's sister) away? – fjack Nov 29 '18 at 12:55
1

The answer is:

Sarah and Ann’s sister are away on an important assignment.

There are two subject in this sentence: "Sarah" and "Ann’s sister". So you should use "are".

If the sentence was:

Sarah's and Ann’s sister is/are away on an important assignment.

with one subject "Sarah's and Ann’s sister", the answer would be "is".

0

It depends as mentioned in the comment if 2 people are away or if 1 is away.

If only Sarah is away:

Sarah, Ann’s sister, is away on an important assignment.

If both Sarah and Ann’s sister are away:

Both Sarah and Ann’s sister are away on an important assignment.

  • I think this has been downvoted since you seem to have misunderstood the intention of the sentence. It's either Sarah, and Ann's sister or the sister of both Sarah and Ann – Andrew Dec 2 '18 at 17:13

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.