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When talking about a classroom in school, college or university, is writing class room instead of classroom as a compound word considered a mistake?

I am asking it because one of my classmates who isn't a native English speaker wrote me a message with this form of class room and I'd like to know if it's a mistake, then I can tell him since he asked me in the past to tell him if I notice a mistake in his English language.

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    Class room might be misinterpreted as classy room. (A room with class.) Especially in conversational English. ("That's a real class room!") The word classroom might have originally been two words, with it since taking on its current closed-form version, but the fact remains that it's now a legitimate single word in any dictionary. Using two separate words may not be technically wrong, but why do so when there is a more common alternative? – Jason Bassford Nov 30 '18 at 10:01
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    I would use compound words for types of rooms, if they are in a dictionary. For example "playroom" is but "music room" isn't. – user3169 Dec 1 '18 at 2:39
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The word classroom exists and so you should use it, but whether "class room" is enough of a mistake to raise is doubtful. There are quite a few words that were spelled with a space 100 years ago, but are now written without a space. For example "to day" used to be written with a space.

So if this is the only mistake you can mention it, but it is really picky, and you are probably better letting this one pass.

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If your classmate has specifically asked for your help, then I would not hesitate to give it. If you are unsure, you might point out before that it’s minor or ask afterward if that is the level of detail he wanted, but such questions are hard to answer without an example, which you now have.

As a native speaker, my parents would correct any error I made as a child. They would simply say back the correct version and require me to say it too before they would respond. What I remember of it was quite frustrating at the time, but it worked.

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