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"Who among the following singers is from China?"

  1. I would like to know in the aforementioned question, should the noun "singers" be included or should it be rephrased to "Which of the following singers is from China?"

  2. Can "who" and a "noun" go together?

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  1. Practically you can use both as interrogative words: who and which. But each one of them emphasizes something else. When you have choices you should use "which", and when you don't have choice you should use "who". (It is the same for "which" - for choice, and "what" for absent of choice. For example: "What book do you like" Vs. "Which book do you like?")

    • "Who among the following singers is from China?" ✔ (We don't have choices)

    • "Which among the following singers is from China?" ✔ (We have many singers and we should pick up one of them)

  2. Can "who" and a "noun" go together? Yes. The issue isn't the noun but who's behind this noun. Is this noun refers to a person? if the answer is yes then you can use "who". For example: singer, driver, father, mother, brother, are nouns but these nouns instead of pronouns so they considered as personal pronouns for that purpose.

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